cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via
From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.
The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..
It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.
Photography: Pedro Kok
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cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via
From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.
The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..
It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.
Photography: Pedro Kok
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via
From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.
The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..
It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.
Photography: Pedro Kok
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via
From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.
The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..
It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.
Photography: Pedro Kok
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via
From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.
The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..
It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.
Photography: Pedro Kok
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via
From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.
The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..
It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.
Photography: Pedro Kok
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via
From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.
The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..
It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.
Photography: Pedro Kok
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info

cjwho:

Milbank, São Paulo, Brazil by Triptyque | via

From the architect: After realizing the building of Milbank, the international law firm commissioned Triptyque to carry of the interior design. The agency Triptyque proposed to build a unique and historic collection of Brazilian design.

The office furniture Milbank tells 95 years of Brazilian design history. Triptyque, already in charge of the building’s architecture, has created a walk through the history of Brazilian design between objects, their designers, their times. To let this walk free, Triptyque has created spaces who change according to the opening of sliding wood and thanks to the transparent spaces, replacing concrete walls with glass doors. The interior design is a reinterpretation of the traditional organization of an office (succession of workrooms). The Triptyque created workspaces with precious pieces of Brazilian design icons: the conference room table is signed by Niemeyer, the “São Paulo” chairs in the reception are made by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the lawyers’ offices are decorated by pieces signed by Sergio Rodrigues. ..

It was a real challenge for Triptyque to describe and summarize the Brazilian creation. Just like Brazil, the coherence of the collection lies in its diversity: Brazilian production is affected by the processing of materials, the simplicity of the shapes and sometimes, the rudimentary use of technology. There is plurality also in the origins of this production: the Portuguese reference and African intervention create a modern production now belonging to popular taste.

Photography: Pedro Kok

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via
On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.
There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.
To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.
Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info

cjwho:

The House of the Infinite, Cádiz, Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza | via

On a marvelous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea, the most radical house we have ever made. At the very edge of the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, where the sea unites the new and the old continent, emerges a stone platform. At the place where all the ships from the Mediterranean used to pass and still pass by as they head off into the Atlantic.

There we have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea. A house that is a podium crowned by an upper horizontal plane. On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon traced by the sea where the sun goes down. A horizontal plane on high built in stone, Roman travertine, as if it were sand, an infinite plane facing the infinite sea. Nothing more and nothing less.

To materialize this elevated horizontal plane, which is the main living room of the house, we built a large box with 20 meters of frontage and 36 meters deep. And under those first 12 meters we excavated two floors in the solid rock to develop the whole living space.

Photography: Javier Callejas Sevilla

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe